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Covid, staff depression and back issues cause higher-than-target staff absences at Gedling Borough Council

Covid cases, staff mental health, stress and back issues were the predominant factors in a higher-than-average level of staff absence at Gedling Borough Council over the last year.

The Labour-led authority has confirmed the number of days lost per employee was almost 25 per cent above target in the 12 months to March 2022, with each employee missing 11.22 days on average.

This was higher than the nine-day target set nationally for local authorities across the country.

Figures for March alone show Covid and isolation periods played a major part in increasing the authority’s figure, with 103 out of a total 386 absences relating to the virus.

Across the whole financial year, sickness and isolation due to Covid-19 accounted for 13.5 per cent of all absences within the organisation.

David Archer, head of human resources performance and service planning on the authority, says the situation with the virus progressively got worse throughout the financial year.

But speaking in the council’s joint consultative and safety committee on Tuesday (June 7), he stressed the council’s absences are not “outstanding” compared with other Nottinghamshire councils.

He said: “At the start of the year, losses due to Covid were fairly small as a proportion, but as the year went on with strains of Covid that were more virulent, absences and days lost began to increase dramatically.

“By the year-end, we lost 103 days out of 386 because of Covid and, as the year went on, it had more and more impact.”

He told councillors there are no proposals to review the target of employee absences because it has been “achievable” prior to the pandemic.

“The hope would be that, as Covid becomes more endemic, we will manage those absences within normal policies,” he added.

“Because, predominantly I suppose, the effect of Covid becomes less and less, we’d expect the days lost because of that to reduce going forwards.”

However, alongside Covid, Mr Archer says back problems and employee stress and mental health issues also caused the 12-month figure to rise.

He told the meeting that the stress “isn’t necessarily work-related” but confirmed there was a “marked increase” in stress and depression cases within the authority.

Gedling Borough Council

He added: “It’s probably not surprising when you think about a recent survey showing people thought their mental health had worsened during the last year.

“The absence really levels really do support that feeling, I suppose.”

He told the meeting the authority has an active wellbeing programme to support staff with their mental health, with the organisation also “actively” promoting one-to-one support for staff.

Further training courses took place in April to support staff with their mental health.

“It has been a problem [but] we’ve tried to do things about it and the hope, as we return to a new normal, is things will become calmer,” he said

The back problems, he added, relate to some frontline workers doing manual work in their roles – as well as some staff working from home.

“Proper assessments have been taken for people at home, the concern was some people might suffer from back problems due to unsuitable work stations but that doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Speaking after Mr Archer’s report, Councillor Paul Wilkinson (Lab), who represents Carlton, described the absence figures as “disappointing”.

However, he praised the work of Mr Archer’s team and said he believes the authority is doing what it can to bring absence levels down.

He said: “It is a little bit disappointing but I think we all understand the reasons why [the figure is higher than the target].

“I know [Mr Archer] and his team are doing all they can to keep absences down.”

Two’s company as new homes on Arnold’s Eagles Edge development sell in double-quick time

Twin sisters bought a property on a new development in Arnold – without even seeing the showhouse.

Sophie and Bethanie Beldham, 26, will be the first to move into the Eagles Edge development at Redhill.

Such has been the popularity of the superior-specification 72-home Barwood Homes site, off Mansfield Road, that more than half of the homes were snapped up before the marketing suite was unveiled in late April.

Sophie, a midwife, and Bethanie, a civil servant, got the keys at the end of April and moved into their two-bed home in May.

Sophie, who is originally from Arnold, described why the sisters acted so impulsively in buying their home off-plan at the site, which consists of a mixture of one, two and three-bed houses and one-bed apartments.

“I felt it was a good opportunity – I had been waiting for new-builds to come up in my area that were in my price range. I felt a new-build had lots of benefits.

“I’d been looking on the market for a while and the housing market is really difficult.

“But I felt that once you have put down a deposit on a new-build, you can’t get gazumped.”

Sophie lived at home with her parents before moving in with Bethanie in her rented accommodation, ahead of their purchase.

She added: “I like that the design is open-plan, modern, it’s got a good-sized garden and that it’s on the edge of Arnold – the location is good for walks in the countryside.”

Mandy Soames, sales and marketing director for Barwood Homes, said the speedy sale of the homes was down to high demand combined with a lack of supply.

“We had many people enquiring through our own website as well as that of our marketing agent William H Brown as far back as last autumn,” she said.

“Eagles Edge has been one our most successful developments selling off plan, with nearly 50 per cent reserved or sold before the marketing suite opened in April.

“There is a huge demand for the two-bedroom homes, which are being snapped up as soon as they are released.

“There is a healthy demand for new-builds in this location and our product suits any type of buyer. We have a range of different types of buyers from first-time buyers to second movers and down-sizers.”

Mandy added: “People like new-builds as lifestyle is so important these days. Buying a new home means low maintenance, they don’t want huge gardens that take up all their spare time. Our gardens are just the right size – big enough to enjoy yet small enough to manage. Running costs are also lower due to using modern methods of construction that we use.”

Johanna Tatt, senior site sales executive for William H Brown, said: “These are lovely homes, due to the quality of the build, and they suit so many people on the market, such as down-sizers, first-time buyers and investors, offering a really nice range of properties in a very nice location.”

Travel chaos looms for train passengers in Gedling borough as rail workers vote to strike

Train passengers using Gedling borough services face travel disruption later this month after rail workers voted to stage three days of strike action in a dispute over pay and jobs.

East Midlands Railway staff will be amongst more than 50,000 railway workers staging a walkout on June 21, 23 and 25 in the biggest strike on the network since 1989.

The union said they were taking the action that is set to cause misery to millions of commuters after negotiations with rail bosses to secure a pay proposal and a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies broke down.

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said: “Railway workers have been treated appallingly and despite our best efforts in negotiations, the rail industry with the support of the government has failed to take their concerns seriously.

“We have a cost-of-living crisis, and it is unacceptable for railway workers to either lose their jobs or face another year of a pay freeze when inflation is at 11.1pc and rising.

EMR train at Carlton Station
PICTURED: An EMR train at Carlton Station (PHOTO: Gedling Eye)

“Our union will now embark on a sustained campaign of industrial action which will shut down the railway system.

“Rail companies are making at least £500m a year in profits, whilst fat cat rail bosses have been paid millions during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“This unfairness is fuelling our members anger and their determination to win a fair settlement.

“RMT is open to meaningful negotiations with rail bosses and ministers, but they will need to come up with new proposals to prevent months of disruption on our railways.”

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said:“It is incredibly disappointing the RMT have decided to take action that could drive passengers away from the rail network for good.

“The pandemic has changed travel habits – with 25% fewer ticket sales and the taxpayer stepping in to keep the railways running at a cost of £16bn, equivalent to £600 per household. We must act now to put the industry on a sustainable footing.

“We are working with industry to reduce disruption caused by strike action, but Unions are jumping the gun by announcing this when talks have only just begun. We once again want to urge the unions to come to talks with the rail industry so we can work together to build a better, more modern, passenger-focussed, railway.”

Police questioned on rise in knife crime across Notts

Nottinghamshire Police faced questions about how they are tackling knife crime after more than 100 extra reports were recorded in the space of a year.

Cllr Neghat Khan (Lab), portfolio holder for community safety at Nottingham City Council, asked what was being done locally following a series of stabbings in the city in recent weeks.

She called for answers from the Police and Crime Commissioner, Caroline Henry, at a Police and Crime Panel meeting at County Hall on Monday, June 6.

In the 12 months to March 2021, Nottinghamshire Police recorded 703 violent knife crime offences. In the 12 months to March 2022, this rose to 809.

Violence with injury also rose from 9,061 to 11,353. This was due to the relaxation of Covid restrictions and the re-opening of the night-time economy, the police said.

A report prepared for the meeting said levels of violent knife crime increased by over 15 per cent over the last year, driven by increases in the latest quarter resulting in a six year high in March 2022.

The policing areas – City Central and City Centre – accounted for the majority of knife crime in early March with occurrences “inflated by multiple victims”.

Several occurrences also appear to be the same group of offenders, the report stated, with over a quarter of offences also being reported as domestic related.

Some of the most recent incidents include the death of Ricardo Cotteral, 33, who was attacked in Broad Street, on Sunday, April 24, just before 2am.

He died a short time later after collapsing in nearby Lower Parliament Street. A number of people have been charged with his murder.

A teenager was also charged with attempted murder after a police officer was stabbed in the buttock after carrying out a stop and search in North Sherwood Street at 11pm on Monday, April 25.

And on Saturday,  May 7, a 14-year-old boy was reportedly stabbed twice on Cheapside, off Old Market Square, at 4.10pm. An arrest has been made.

Cllr Khan asked the Police and Crime Commissioner: “As a Nottingham city resident, we have seen six stabbings over a period of eight weeks.

“So, what are you doing to hold the Chief Constable to account with serious violence in the city and what are you doing to manage public perception over this issue?

“When you talk to young people, they say to feel safe they have to carry a knife. How do we move from that perception where they feel they do not have to carry one.”

Mrs Henry responded: “I was disappointed with the amount of knife crime. We are doing a series of things. We have the Violence Reduction Unit and our knife crime teams.

“We are hoping it was a blip. Nationally, there has been an increase too, but I can assure you we are monitoring it closely.”

Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire Police, Craig Guildford said prevention was the key.

He said while there are police officers educating students in secondary schools, there needs to be an increased push around primary schools as well.

He said: “One has to reflect on how far we have come. We are below the national and regional average in knife crime. Every one of those knife crimes is one too many and you are right, when it involves young kids it is concerning.

There has been a rise in knife crime across the area
Caroline Henry
PCC Caroline Henry was asked why knife crime had risen across Notts by county councillors(PHOTO: LDR service)

“I think in March we saw an increase and we made arrests on nearly all of those jobs and they are working their way through the criminal justice process.

“They are not just all young people but there were a couple involving young people and sadly a couple of jobs where police officers received injuries too.

“The main emphasis is keeping the money in prevention and working with partners and trying to increase the number of cops.

“It is a minority not a majority expressing the view that it is safer to carry because statistically it definitely is not. We need to keep the pressure on what fuels that knife crime in particular the street dealing of drugs.”

Nottinghamshire Police faced questions about how they are tackling knife crime after more than 100 extra reports were recorded in the space of a year.

Cllr Neghat Khan (Lab), portfolio holder for community safety at Nottingham City Council, asked what was being done locally following a series of stabbings in the city in recent weeks.

She called for answers from the Police and Crime Commissioner, Caroline Henry, at a Police and Crime Panel meeting at County Hall on Monday, June 6.

In the 12 months to March 2021, Nottinghamshire Police recorded 703 violent knife crime offences. In the 12 months to March 2022, this rose to 809.

Violence with injury also rose from 9,061 to 11,353. This was due to the relaxation of Covid restrictions and the re-opening of the night-time economy, the police said.

A report prepared for the meeting said levels of violent knife crime increased by over 15 per cent over the last year, driven by increases in the latest quarter resulting in a six year high in March 2022.

The policing areas – City Central and City Centre – accounted for the majority of knife crime in early March with occurrences “inflated by multiple victims”.

Several occurrences also appear to be the same group of offenders, the report stated, with over a quarter of offences also being reported as domestic related.

Some of the most recent incidents include the death of Ricardo Cotteral, 33, who was attacked in Broad Street, on Sunday, April 24, just before 2am.

He died a short time later after collapsing in nearby Lower Parliament Street. A number of people have been charged with his murder.

A teenager was also charged with attempted murder after a police officer was stabbed in the buttock after carrying out a stop and search in North Sherwood Street at 11pm on Monday, April 25.

And on Saturday,  May 7, a 14-year-old boy was reportedly stabbed twice on Cheapside, off Old Market Square, at 4.10pm. An arrest has been made.

Cllr Khan asked the Police and Crime Commissioner: “As a Nottingham city resident, we have seen six stabbings over a period of eight weeks.

“So, what are you doing to hold the Chief Constable to account with serious violence in the city and what are you doing to manage public perception over this issue?

“When you talk to young people, they say to feel safe they have to carry a knife. How do we move from that perception where they feel they do not have to carry one.”

Mrs Henry responded: “I was disappointed with the amount of knife crime. We are doing a series of things. We have the Violence Reduction Unit and our knife crime teams.

“We are hoping it was a blip. Nationally, there has been an increase too, but I can assure you we are monitoring it closely.”

Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire Police, Craig Guildford said prevention was the key.

He said while there are police officers educating students in secondary schools, there needs to be an increased push around primary schools as well.

He said: “One has to reflect on how far we have come. We are below the national and regional average in knife crime. Every one of those knife crimes is one too many and you are right, when it involves young kids it is concerning.

“I think in March we saw an increase and we made arrests on nearly all of those jobs and they are working their way through the criminal justice process.

“They are not just all young people but there were a couple involving young people and sadly a couple of jobs where police officers received injuries too.

“The main emphasis is keeping the money in prevention and working with partners and trying to increase the number of cops.

“It is a minority not a majority expressing the view that it is safer to carry because statistically it definitely is not. We need to keep the pressure on what fuels that knife crime in particular the street dealing of drugs.”

Gedling’s MP backs Boris Johnson in no confidence vote

Gedling MP Tom Randall today revealed he backed beleaguered Prime Minister Boris Johnson in last night’s no confidence vote.

Monday night’s vote in the prime minister saw 148 Tory MPs reject him, while 211 backed Mr Johnson.

Mr Randall took to social media to reveal his reasons for backing the under pressure PM.

He wrote: “The behaviour described in Sue Gray’s report is disturbing. It would have been unacceptable at any time, but particularly when restrictions were imposed. It was, at best, tone-deaf to the spirit of the times. When Sue Gray published her update to her inquiry in January 2022, I said that I could not defend or justify the behaviour that has been described. I say that again.

“Many of you have written to me to share your thoughts on what has gone on. Some are simply unhappy or shocked, others take the view that the Prime Minister ought to resign. Given that the Prime Minister has overall responsibility for the culture and what takes place in Downing Street, I entirely see why you might form that view.

“Others have written to me to say that they strongly support the Prime Minister’s and the Government’s wider legislative agenda and that the Prime Minister should get on with pursuing it. There is, I think, a third strand of opinion, and one that I often detect when speaking to people in the street, that there are serious misgivings about what has occurred, but that it does not fundamentally change their overall view of the Government.

“My own view, for what it’s worth, is that the conclusions of the Sue Gray report are serious. They represent a failure of leadership that sullies the reputation of a government that I am otherwise proud to support.”

Randall then went on to reveal which way he voted.

“Last night, I was asked to vote on whether I had confidence in Boris Johnson as leader of the Conservative Party,” he said.

“I didn’t seek such a vote but my colleagues have a right to ask for one and it tests the mood of the parliamentary party.

“I did not approach last night’s vote lightly. I considered the achievements of the Prime Minister (which on increased health and education spending, on extra police officers and on vaccines have been very positive for Gedling) against the very legitimate criticisms that have been made of him. On balance, I voted that I have confidence.

Boris Johnson
PICTURED: Prime Minsiter Boris Johnson

“In her report, Sue Gray said that she is pleased that progress is being made in introducing changes to the organisation and management of Downing Street and the Cabinet Office to create clearer lines of leadership and accountability. She said that these changes now need the chance and time to bed in. It is important that this happens and it is right that there is scrutiny to ensure that where mistakes have been made that they are corrected and not repeated in future.

He added: “There will be strongly-held principled views on recent events (and whether my vote was or was not the right one) but there are also serious practical issues that the government needs to tackle: bringing inflation down, helping ordinary Gedling residents with the cost of living, improving our public services, including the NHS’s recovery from Covid, and stopping Cross-Channel migration. I believe that the Prime Minister does have the drive and determination to meet these challenges as we recover from the pandemic and it is important that the Government continues to step up and work hard on these issues.”

“Serving as the Member of Parliament for Gedling is an immense privilege. Trying to reflect the varied views of my hometown in a single vote is difficult. But I hope that the foregoing has helped to explain my thinking last night.”

New Nisa owner wants to reassure residents in Gedling about new store replacing Co-op next month

A new Nisa Local store will replace the local Co-op in Gedling next month and its owner is promising ‘more choice’ for residents.

The Gedling Road Co-op will close its doors in early July and the new independent owner will re-open under a Nisa Local fascia just days later.

Dharsan Premkumar of independent convenience store operator The Highbury Vale Limited, said the Nisa Local will offer a wide selection of Co-op own brand products including all the best sellers and there will be more choice for shoppers.

He said: “We are very community based and so we make sure our range responds to what our shoppers want.

“We will still be offering our customers the best of Co-op through a bigger Co-op own-brand range than is currently available, and overall there will be more choice in the store from across all brands.”

 New promotions and deals will be introduced from many well-known brands, a coffee machine is to be installed along with a Payzone service and the current Evri service (previously Hermes) will continue to operate.

Nisa is part of The Co-op Group, which also means the current staff employed in the store will remain, ensuring a continued friendly service from familiar faces in the store.

“We are looking forward to opening the store with a fresh look and offering even more choice to local people in the community,” added Dharsan.

The current Co-op is set to cease trading on Tuesday, July 12 with the Nisa Local set to open its doors less than a week later on Monday, July 18.

‘Violent’ Arnold burglar dragged victim out of bed and gagged her

A heroic police officer fought with and detained a violent burglar from Arnold who broke into a home.

Durrell Hartley, of Arnold, stormed into the house in Edwalton and headed straight upstairs into the main bedroom, dragged his victim out of bed and gagged her before demanding to be told where money was being kept.

After further ordering her to tell him where a watch and phone were, he then shoved the woman grabbing her mouth and neck while he continued messily searching the bedroom.

The 23-year-old then dragged her downstairs and forced her to accompany him as he continued to ransack the house in search of valuables.

Hearing police sirens outside, Hartley attempted to flee from the address but was quickly confronted in the property by the lone officer.

A violent struggle then ensued, with Hartley fighting the officer in a desperate bid to escape.

The officer was left needing surgery after breaking his hand in two places but was still able to stop Hartley in his tracks and hold onto him until back-up arrived.

The victim’s partner was also attacked during the incident which happened on the night of Friday 5 November 2021.

Appearing at Nottingham Crown Court on Monday (6 June) Hartley was jailed for a total of eight years after pleading guilty to aggravated burglary and possession of cannabis. He also admitted breaching a suspended sentence order.

Detective Constable Nathan Wall, of Nottinghamshire Police, said: “This must have been an incredibly scary ordeal for the victims, who were both violently assaulted in their own home.

“The responding officer in this case showed extreme bravery as he first confronted and then fought with Hartley inside the address.

“Had this violent criminal managed to get away he may well have escaped justice altogether. As it is he is now starting a lengthy jail sentence.

“I hope today’s sentence provides at least some comfort to the victims and also sends a strong message to others who are thinking of carrying out offences of this nature.

“We will respond very quickly and we will do everything in our power to bring you to justice.”

The planned roadworks and road changes in Gedling borough over the next few weeks

A number of roadworks, and changes to the roads, are set to take place on Gedling borough’s roads during the next few days.

The roadworks and road changes include things such as speed alterations, repair works and changing the layout of the roads. 

Most of the roadworks are being undertaken by Nottinghamshire County Council while a couple are being led by Severn Trent Water.

These are the roadworks and closures you need to know about

Blidworth Waye, Ravenshead

13 June – 16 June

Delays likely – Road closure

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

Chestnut Grove, Burton Joyce

13 June – 08 July

Delays likely – Road closure

Responsibility for works: Cadent

Coningsby Road, Woodthorpe

13 June – 15 June

Delays likely – Road closure

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

Gedling Road, Arnold

11 June – 12 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (multi-way signals)

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

Current status: Planned work about to start

High Street, Arnold

12 June – 12 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (multi-way signals)

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

road_closed

Kirkby Road, Ravenshead

08 June – 10 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (Stop/Go boards)

Description: Gully cleansing

Works location: Entire Length

Responsibility for works: Nottinghamshire County Council

Mansfield Road, Daybrook

10 June – 10 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (two-way signals)

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

Mapperley Plains, Arnold

09 June – 09 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (Stop/Go boards)

Description: Installation of Roundel On Carriageway

Works location: Opposite number 363

Responsibility for works: Nottinghamshire County Council

Meadow Lane, Burton Joyce

13 June – 08 July

Delays likely – Road closure

Responsibility for works: Cadent

Woodborough Road, Nottingham

11 June – 12 June

Delays likely – Traffic control (two-way signals)

Responsibility for works: Severn Trent Water

‘Ashamed’ Caroline Henry will offer public grants to catch speeding motorists despite being caught five times herself

Nottinghamshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner Caroline Henry said she remains committed to catching speeding motorists despite being caught five times herself.

Henry was elected as crime commissioner in May 2021 and is responsible for holding Nottinghamshire Police to account and overseeing the force’s spending.

She appeared at Nottingham Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, May 3, after committing five speeding offences from March to June 2021.

Mrs Henry, 51, of Giltbrook, pleaded guilty to all five offences. The case will be heard and sentenced by a district judge in July.

The case led critics to call for her to resign from the £76,500-a-year job, and some also questioned whether she could be removed from office because she had pleaded guilty to a crime.

On Monday she appeared at her first formal public meeting since her court appearance.

The Police and Crime Panel at County Hall on Monday, June 6, is set up to support and challenge Mrs Henry about the decisions she makes.

It is made up of both councillors and independent members.

A report to the panel published before the before the meeting says 12 complaints about the commissioner were received in response to media reports following her court appearance.

It states the panel does not need to record a conduct matter if it “has been, or is already being, dealt with by means of criminal proceedings against the person to whose conduct the matter relates”.

Once court proceedings are concluded on July 19, the matter remains “outside the scope” of the panel’s arrangements for dealing with complaints and conduct matters.

Conduct matters and serious complaints are therefore to be referred to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC).

This includes Police and Crime Commissioner actions where there is an indication of criminal wrongdoing. However, there’s an exclusion if already subject to criminal proceedings.

The IOPC will therefore not be investigating the matter.

The chair of Nottinghamshire’s Police and Crime Panel, Christine Goldstraw, who served as a magistrate for 10 years, said she believed the only way Mrs Henry could leave office is by being voted out, unless she chose to stand down.

Councillors and independent members at the Police and Crime Panel meeting were advised not to challenge Mrs Henry until the court case had concluded.

However, Mrs Henry said she wanted to address the room.

She said: “I think it is only right to publicly acknowledge the court case in which I am involved as a private citizen.

“Given that some of the information is already in the public domain, unfortunately because this matter has not been formally concluded at court I cannot discuss it or take questions on the matter.

“I have to avoid any possible interference in the judicial outcome of the case, which will be concluded in approximately six weeks time.

“What I am able to do however is restate the apology.

“I am very ashamed, embarrassed and sorry and I remain passionate about fulfilling the responsibility expected of me as Police and Crime Commissioner for Nottinghamshire.”

Later in the meeting, she was asked by Cllr Michael Edwards (Lab), ward councillor for the Meadows at Nottingham City Council, about her commitment to speeding.

He said: “We have been on it for years in Nottingham city and done some controversial things. The car driving public do not appreciate what we do but we have got the city down to a 20mph speed limit.

“Some of it is not instantly popular – but we know we have got to get speeding down and do more – including catching people and prosecuting people for speeding.”

Mrs Henry responded: “There is about 100,000 people in Nottinghamshire each year that break the speed limit and out of those 40,000 are entitled to a speeding awareness course.

“As part of the next round of my community grants there will be an opportunity for people to bid in to do community speedwatch. I am absolutely committed to doing this.”

Following the court case there have been public calls for the commissioner to resign and criticism by Labour’s Nottingham South MP, Lilian Greenwood, in the House of Commons.

Mrs Henry has consistently said she will not comment further until the case is concluded in July.

Changes to bus timetables on Gedling borough NCT services announced

Nottingham City Transport have today announced plans to introduce new timetables on some Gedling borough services from Sunday 19th June 2022. 

The new timetables reflect driver availability and passenger levels over the summer period, ensuring NCT advertises a level of service that customers can rely on and matches current demand. NCT passenger numbers are currently at around 80% of their pre-pandemic levels.

The following changes to Monday to Saturday daytime timetables will be made:

Lilac 25 and 27 will each operate every 15 minutes on Monday to Saturday daytimes, providing a combined 7/8 minute frequency between City and Carlton Square. 

Red 44 bus
PICTURED: Red 44 bus

Sky Blue 45 will operate every 12 minutes on Saturday daytimes to Mapperley and Gedling. 

There will be revised Sunday timetables on Red 44.

David Astill, NCT managing director said, “With patronage levels only at around 80% of what they were pre-pandemic, we are reluctantly introducing timetable changes to some services. This will also ensure we can deliver the timetable we advertise over the summer, when there is a peak in drivers having their well-earned summer holiday too”.

New timetables can be viewed in the NCTX Buses app and at www.nctx.co.uk with printed timetable leaflets available from regular outlets from the end of this week.