Scheme to make privately rented homes safer across Gedling Borough may be extended

Following a consultation with residents and landlords, a decision on plans to extend the council’s Selective Licensing Scheme is expected to be made at the council’s Cabinet Meeting

More articles

Plans to extend a scheme to make privately rented homes safer for people to live across Gedling borough are due to be discussed by councillors next week.

Following a consultation with residents and landlords, a decision on plans to extend the council’s Selective Licensing Scheme, which makes it mandatory for landlords to hold a licence for each of their private rented properties, is expected to be made at the council’s Cabinet Meeting on July 6.

Tenants

In October 2018, a Selective Licensing Scheme was launched in Netherfield which saw over 400 private rented properties inspected by the council’s Environmental Health Officers. Of those inspected, 78% were identified as requiring remedial works to bring them up to the minimum legal safety standard and protect the health and safety of tenants. 40 properties inspected had imminent hazards in areas such as fire safety because of inadequate fire protection or detection, which all required immediate action to protect tenants. 

Following the pilot scheme in Netherfield, a consultation was held asking for views to extend the scheme to parts of Colwick, Carlton Hill, Daybrook and Newstead Village. The consultation received more than 200 responses and over 450 written comments which have been analysed and the feedback used to shape the council’s final proposals for the scheme.

Gedling Borough Council plans to work with landlords and residents to improve properties, but where necessary will use licensing conditions and enforcement powers to bring about improvements. 

Civic Centre Arnold
TALKS: An extension to the scheme will be discussed next week by the council during a meeting at the Civic Centre in Arnold
- Advertisement -

Selective Licensing can be applied in areas where there is deprivation, high levels of antisocial behaviour, high levels of crime, high levels of migration and poor housing conditions. The licensing will give the council’s Environmental Health Team powers to ensure properties are managed effectively and to do more when landlords are not taking steps to deal with issues relating to property standards. The income generated from the Selective Licensing Scheme is used to cover the costs of administering and staffing the scheme. 

Leader of Gedling Borough Council, Councillor John Clarke MBE said: “One of our main priorities is to improve the health and wellbeing of our residents and reduce health inequalities. An important part of that is to ensure our resident’s homes are safe and suitable.

“Our pilot scheme in Netherfield found that 78% of privately rented properties needed work carrying out to them to bring them up to a safe and legal standard for residents to live in. As a direct result of Selective Licensing we’ve been able to work with landlords to make the necessary improvements to their properties to help improve the lives and safety of their tenants.

“By extending this scheme to other parts of the borough we’ll be able to monitor privately rented properties closer and be able to do more to step in to help even more residents and landlords if needed.”

  • Don’t miss another story! Get Gedling Eye’s news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up to our weekly newsletter here

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

- Advertisement -

Don't Miss