People in Gedling to have say on ‘super council’ plan for Notts

Informal consultation taking place over plans to shake-up local government in Nottinghamshire

County_Hall_Nottingham
PICTURED: County Hall

People in Gedling borough are being given the chance to have their say on plans to create a ‘super council’ across Nottinghamshire.

An informal consultation was launched today (3) by Nottinghamshire County Council, who wants residents, businesses and councils to share their views on future plans for the local government in Nottinghamshire.

The council have said that this isn’t a formal consultation, but they are now seeking the views of local people “as they will help to shape any potential future plans for restructuring in the future.”

Councillors will consider responses to this first phase of public engagement alongside a raft of other evidence at the the Full Council meeting on December 13, when they will decide whether or not to pursue plans for a unitary council — which the Council would then formally consult the public on next year.

Councillor Kay Cutts, Leader of Nottinghamshire County Council, said: “Local government in Nottinghamshire is at a crossroads.

Cllr Kay Cutts: “Local government in Nottinghamshire is at a crossroads. “

“Due to significant reductions in the funding we receive to provide services and continually increasing demand for our social care services, we are facing the prospect of huge cuts to frontline services and increasing council tax, year-on-year, unless there is a fundamental change in the way we operate.

READ MORE:  Critics say super council plans could be 'dead in the water'



“Since 2010 – under different political leaderships – the Council has saved over £270m in running costs, yet we still face a budget gap of £54m. We have exhausted all the options available to make the cost reductions we need without significantly impacting local people and reorganisation of local government in the county appears to be the only alternative.

IMAGE: Map shows how Notts is currently governed (PICTURE: NCC)

She added: “Local government services impact every one of us, every day of our lives, so this is a very important debate. I would urge everyone to read the Future Nottinghamshire document and let us know their views.”

The public engagement work is being carried out by independent social research company, ORS.

The first phase of the public engagement work taking place this month will include:

  • An online survey at www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/futurenotts
  • Focus groups with members of the public from across the county
  • Meetings with district councils, parish councils, businesses and the voluntary sector

Further details, including the Future Nottinghamshire public engagement document which contains comprehensive background information, are available from all 60 Nottinghamshire libraries or online at www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/futurenotts

The survey closes on Wednesday, October 31.

3 Comments

  1. Keep Gedling separate. Nottingham didn’t do much for us when it came to gritting, and the tree at the side of my house on a unmade road is growing fast again, and I don’t see why I should have to pay hundreds of pounds to keep it away from my property when they go chopping loads of trees down which aren’t causing problems to anyone. Keep Gedling, Gedling.

    • Its always puzzled me why we have two councils. Two lots of highly paid officers, two lots of councillors, two headquarters, two lots of depots. If there’s a way all that can be absorbed into one, why wouldn’t we. All councils are clearly because of austerity – I’d much rather they spend what they have on our roads looking after old folk than double the number of pen pushers they really need.

  2. This is purely an ego trip and a power grab. Any savings over many years will be used up partly in financing this con and then in the costs of restructuring. Local decisions need to be made locally by the District and Borough Councils. How could a County Councillor for a division in Rushcliffe make a sensible Planning decision about a property in Worksop. Similarly how could a Licencing application in Newark be meaningfully reviewed by a Councillor from the North of Nottinghamshire. Keep the status quo.Keep decision making and services local. If this idea had any real value, all decisions would be centralised to London

    Read more about this on Gedling Eye at: http://www.gedlingeye.co.uk/news/opinion-councillor-kay-cutts-super-council/

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