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Bestwood,Carlton and Daybrook men among gang jailed for over 50 years for drugs plot

Bestwood

Bestwood,Carlton and Daybrook men among gang jailed for over 50 years for drugs plot

Gang jailed for more than 50 years for their involvement in plots to supply drugs to Nottinghamshire and West Midlands.

Members of a drugs gang – including men from Bestwood, Carlton and Daybrook – have been jailed for more than 50 years for their involvement in plots to supply drugs in Nottinghamshire and the West Midlands.

A gun, bullets, drugs, cash and various drugs paraphernalia, were seized during the investigation into the Nottingham-based crime gang.

The extent of the group’s illegal activity was identified after officers from the East Midlands Special Operations Unit (EMSOU), working in conjunction with Nottinghamshire Police, conducted a detailed investigation into their movements and associations.

It revealed a complex network of organised illegal activity operating out of Bulwell and Bestwood.

During a number of searches between February 2014 and June 2014 objects officers seized from the gang included a Beretta handgun, a clip of seven bullets, £1,000 in bank notes, 32 cannabis plants, two hydraulic presses used to manufacture cocaine and hydroponics equipment.

At a series of hearings held at Leicester Crown Court, all twelve faced drug offences. They were sentenced as follows:

• Steven Watson, of Gainsford Crescent in Bestwood, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class A and B drugs and received a six-year prison sentence.‎

The 59-year-old was also found guilty‎ after a trial of conspiracy to possess both a firearm and ammunition. On Thursday 11 August 2016 he was sentenced at Nottingham Crown Court to six years and two years respectively, to run concurrently to each other but consecutive to his drugs sentence.

This brings Watson’s total sentence to 12 years imprisonment, with a minimum term of six years, to serve the remainder on licence.

• Andrew Breslin, aged 45, of Gainsford Crescent in Bestwood, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class A and B drugs and received seven years in jail.

• Adrian Davey, of Mansfield Road in Daybrook, Nottinghamshire, pleaded guilty to possession of a firearm and received six-and-a-half years in jail. The 28-year-old was also found guilty after a trial of conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and was given a six-month custodial sentence, to run concurrently.

• Elliott Butler, aged 23, of Bentinck Street, Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class A drugs and was jailed for five years and three months.

• Richard Taylor, aged 33, of Fife Avenue in Wolverhampton, West Midlands, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and the production of Class B drugs and was sentenced to four years imprisonment.

• After a trial Ashley Prater, aged 30, of Montague Road in Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, was found guilty of conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and sent to prison for four years.

• Lyndon Leith, aged 37, of Chisholm Way in Bestwood, Nottinghamshire, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and was sentenced to three years and 10 months imprisonment.‎

• After a trial David Langford, aged 46, of Jedburgh Walk in Nottingham, was found guilty of conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and received three years and nine months in prison.

• Tara Shelton, aged 21, of Bentinck Street in Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class A drugs and given a three-year jail term.

• Imran Shabbir, aged 36, of Bracadale Road in Nottingham, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and sentenced to two years and three months imprisonment.‎

• Dean Antoni Reid, aged 39, of Conway Close in Nottingham, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and received 47 weeks in custody, suspended for 24 months.

• Amal Fawzi, aged 38, of Second Avenue in Carlton, Nottinghamshire, was found guilty after a trial of conspiracy to supply Class B drugs and given a 33-week jail term, suspended for two years.

EMSOU Detective Chief Inspector Paul Myers, who led the investigation, said: “Whether it is low-level dealing, or highly organised trafficking and distribution, we are committed to cutting off drug supply and bringing those responsible to justice.

“As this case illustrates, with some good police work, often one name can lead to another, and then another and then another, until you have a criminal gang before a judge.

“As a result ten people, a quantity of drugs and manufacturing equipment, and a firearm have been removed from our communities and an illicit drugs network dismantled.”

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