Brave young burns survivor from Arnold shares her story to help those with similar injuries

Adanaé Liburd-Graham was just seven years old when her cotton dress caught fire during Christmas celebrations

Adanae-Liburd-Graham
BRAVE: L to r, Adanaé is pictured with mum Nicola (Mum) and Muhammad - Arif Patel, father of Maryam

A young girl from Arnold who was badly burned after her clothers caught fire has this week bravely shared stories about her experiences with a fellow survivor. 

Adanaé Liburd-Graham, 10, was just seven years old when her cotton dress caught fire during Christmas celebrations at her family home in Nottingham.

She suffered 32% total burns across her body and has been receiving treatment for her injuries at Nottingham Burns and Plastic Unit at Queen’s Medical Centre over the last three years.

Adanaé’s Mum, Nicola Liburd from Arnold, described the moment her daughter’s dress caught fire three years ago.

Nicola said: “It seemed to happen in a matter of seconds, we were initially taken to Birmingham before being transferred to the Nottingham burns unit, where we attend regular appointments now.

It has really helped coming to the Burns Unit everybody on the ward has been lovely and very supportive, being able to speak to other burns survivors is a really positive step and it’s nice for other families to be able to share their experiences. Meeting other young burns survivors has really helped Adanaé’s confidence.”

Adanaé met with five year old Maryam, who earlier this year experienced five per cent total body burns and was taken to hospital after hot curry fell on her whilst in the kitchen at home, severely burning her arm and legs.



Maryam’s Dad, Muhammad-Arif Patel from Leicester said: “You don’t expect something like this to happen, it was quite shocking, I think with Maryam being young it can be difficult for her to talk about these things with other children at school when they are curious and ask questions, but as a parent it is good to meet other burns survivors and their families in a similar position.”

Mr Patel added: “You don’t realise how strong kids are and as parent you feel powerless in that moment but the kids are really strong and that has been great to see.”

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Nottingham Burns and Plastic Unit provides support and care for patients across the East Midlands, working closely with Burns Services in Leicester and Birmingham. The team includes occupational therapists, physiotherapists, children’s psychologists and dietitians specialised in burns care.

The National NHS Burns Service treated more than 15,000 patients for burns and scalds last year and each month 625 children require admission to an NHS Burns Service following a burn or scald injury.

Andrea Cronshaw, Children’s Clinical Nurse Specialist at Nottingham Burns and Plastics Unit said: “Adanaé has been a very positive throughout what has been a difficult time for her and her family. She has a very can-do attitude and has attended Burns Camp for young children and their families for the last three years, to help rebuild her confidence. Burns Camp is often the only time burns survivors are able to meet with others who have experienced similar things to themselves, outside of the hospital environment.”

Advice for parents and the public regarding burns and first aid:

 First Aid:

Good first aid following a burn or scald can make an enormous difference in recovery times and the severity of scarring.

Stop, Drop, Roll is used when clothing catches fire. Children get confused about when to stop, drop and roll. It is important to know when to do this. Stop, drop and roll should be used when clothing catches fire.

Cool, Call, Cover

First Aid advice from the British Burn Association

1-    Cool the burn with running cold tap water for 20 minutes and remove all clothing and jewellery (unless it is melted or firmly stuck to the wound)

2-    Call for help 999,111 or a local GP for advice

3-    Cover with cling film or a sterile, non-fluffy dressing or cloth – make sure patient is kept warm.

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